Digital Citizenship Week

Add to Calendar 2021-10-18 00:00:00 2021-10-22 23:59:00 America/New_York Digital Citizenship Week no event location specified TRANSPARENT

Bring Digital Citizenship Week Home! 

Monday:

SELF-AWARENESS IN DIGITAL LIFE

Talk About How Your Child Can Avoid the Negative Effects of Oversharing Your child is learning how social media can affect how they feel and behave online. Use these questions to talk with them about how the pressure to share on social media can affect them. 

Ask these three questions:

  1. Have you seen people share personal feelings or other things on social media that they probably regretted later? How did it make you feel to see that?
    • If your child is reluctant to talk, share your own example of someone—maybe even yourself—who has overshared. Talk about how that experience made you feel.
  2. Why do you think people overshare?
    • Listen for (or suggest if needed):
      • Didn't think about who could see the post.
      • Pressure to make your life seem cool/exciting.
      • To get attention.
      • To express yourself and share emotions.
  3. How do you think people can avoid the negative effects of oversharing?
    • Listen for (or suggest if needed):
      • Think about when and why you're posting something before you share it.
      • Talk to your friends (and family!) about your boundaries for tagging or posting about each other.
      • Use your device settings to limit how much time you spend on social media.

Learn more about how to define your digital footprint here!

Tuesday:

SELF-MANAGEMENT IN DIGITAL LIFE

Talk About How Your Child Can Manage Their Digital Habits 

Your child is learning to identify and reflect on the habits they have with digital media and devices. Use these questions to talk with them about how to find a healthy balance with their online and offline lives.

Ask these three questions:

  1. What do the terms digital habits and media balance mean?
    • Listen for (or suggest if needed):
      • Digital habits are things we do regularly with digital media and devices—like checking your phone when you wake up, listening to music on your way to school, or playing video games before bed.
      • Media balance means using media in a way that feels healthy and in balance with other life activities.
  2. What are some of our family's digital habits?
  3. Are there any you think we should try to change? Why, or why not?

Learn more ways to find balance in your digital lives here.

Wednesday:

RESPONSIBLE DECISION-MAKING IN DIGITAL LIFE

Talk About How Your Child Can Stay Safe When Chatting with Others Online 

Your child is learning strategies to help them make responsible decisions when they're online. Use these questions to talk with them about the benefits and risks of chatting with people online.

Ask these three questions:

  1. What are some of the risks of talking with people you don't know well?
    • Listen for (or suggest if needed):
      • You don't fully know who you're talking to, so you can't completely trust them.
      • You don't know whether they have bad intentions.
  2. What are red flag feelings?
    • Listen for (or suggest if needed):
      • red flag feeling is when something happens on digital media that makes you feel uncomfortable, worried, sad, or anxious. It's often a feeling in your stomach that something is wrong and is a warning of a possible problem.
  3. What can you do if you ever have a red flag feeling when chatting with someone online?
    • Listen for (or suggest if needed):
      • Slow down, pause, and think about how you're feeling and what might be causing it. 
      • Decide on the best action to take to improve the situation (maybe ignore or block the person, log off, or tell a trusted adult).

Learn more about how to protect your privacy online here.

Thursday:

RELATIONSHIP SKILLS IN DIGITAL LIFE

Talk About How Your Child Can Stay Safe When Chatting with Others Online 

Your child is learning strategies to help them make responsible decisions when they're online. Use these questions to talk with them about the benefits and risks of chatting with people online.

Ask these three questions:

  1. What are some of the risks of talking with people you don't know well?
    • Listen for (or suggest if needed):
      • You don't fully know who you're talking to, so you can't completely trust them.
      • You don't know whether they have bad intentions.
  2. What are red flag feelings?
    • Listen for (or suggest if needed):
      • red flag feeling is when something happens on digital media that makes you feel uncomfortable, worried, sad, or anxious. It's often a feeling in your stomach that something is wrong and is a warning of a possible problem.
  3. What can you do if you ever have a red flag feeling when chatting with someone online?
    • Listen for (or suggest if needed):
      • Slow down, pause, and think about how you're feeling and what might be causing it. 
      • Decide on the best action to take to improve the situation (maybe ignore or block the person, log off, or tell a trusted adult).

Learn more about how to communicate online here

Friday:

SOCIAL AWARENESS IN DIGITAL LIFE

Talk About How Your Child Can Understand and Respond to Digital Drama

Your child is learning about emotional conflicts online (also called digital drama). Use these questions to talk with them about digital drama and strategies for de-escalating conflicts online.

 Ask these three questions:

  1. Do you see a lot of digital drama online?
  2. Why do you think these kinds of conflicts happen online?
    • Listen for (or suggest):
      • People feel more free to say things they wouldn't say face-to-face.
      • It's easy to misinterpret what someone says online when you can't see facial reactions or hear tone of voice.
      • People can be anonymous online, making it easier for them to say mean things.
      • People can feel more pressured to respond where others can see it.
  3. Did you talk about ways to de-escalate the drama when you see it? What were some ideas?
    • Listen for (or suggest):
      • Respond with a positive comment or action.
      • Ignore the post.
      • Talk (offline) with the person involved to try to deescalate the situation.

Learn more about how to be kind and courageous online here.